Samsung promotes Apple when Facebook campaign backfires

Zach Epstein reports for BGR, “Samsung recently took to Facebook to ask its followers a simple question — ‘If you could only take one electronic device on a deserted island, what would it be?’”
“Among the 50 most recent responses as of the time of this writing, we count 40 people who said their device of choice would be Apple’s iPhone, and one who said he would take an iPad,” Epstein reports. “Browsing through earlier responses yields much of the same.”

Article from: Mac Daily News

Purported iPhone 5 benchmark score doubles fastest iDevices, outperforms Android’s best

A benchmark score logged on Sunday with Primate Labs’ online Geekbench reportedly details the specifics of Apple’s iPhone 5, with the new smartphone outperforming the average scores of every iOS and Android device on the website.

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The online benchmarking site reportedly logged a score of 1601 from an “iPhone5,2” that was running iOS 6 on a dual-core ARMv7 processor clocked at 1.02GHz with 1GB of RAM. While it is not impossible to spoof device identifiers, the specifications line up with previous speculation that Apple’s A6 SoC boasts a full gigabyte of DRAM and leverages a an ARMv7 CPU with custom-designed cores.

If legitimate, the iPhone5,2’s score eked out the highest-performing Android devices, including the Asus-built Nexus 7 tablet and Samsung Galaxy S III. In comparison, no iOS device has surpassed the 800 mark, as last year’s iPhone 4S netted a 631 while the third-generation iPad (CDMA) scored 734.

When the iPhone 5 was announced on Sept. 12, Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller said the new A6 chip doubled both the processing and graphics performance of the legacy A5 SoC. Also promised was an increase in battery life resulting in 8 hours of 3G or LTE talk time and web browsing.

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The quoted performance bump and increase in power efficiency lead some to believe that Apple’s A6 would be a quad-core CPU built on Samsung’s 32nm fabrication process, however Sunday’s benchmark data suggests the chip holds only two processing cores running at a higher clock speed than the A5 processor. Although the exact configuration Apple is using to achieve the huge performance gains while improving on energy consumption is unclear at this time, a full teardown and analysis of the iPhone 5 is expected to yield answers this week when the device officially hits stores on Friday.

Some customers who pre-ordered the handset on Sept. 14 are reporting that shipments have already begun ahead of launch-day deliveries.

Article From: http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/09/17/purported_iphone_5_benchmark_score_doubles_fastest_idevices_outperforms_androids_best

Engadget reviews Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1: Cheap, inferior, ultimately disposable feel

“For better or worse, Samsung’s sticking to the durability of its signature plastic enclosures. Brushed aluminum backs, it would seem, are for other OEMs. So if premium builds are tops on your checklist, you can safely stop reading now,” Joseph Volpe reports for Engadget. “There’s no two ways about it: the Note 10.1 looks and feels kind of cheap. Starting with our most serious complaint, it’s prone to the squeaks and creaks of inferior budget devices, which is definitely not something you’d associate with a $499 product — let alone a flagship. Despite our protestations, though, this is Samsung’s M.O.”
“For all its girth, the S-Pen still feels as light as a feather — and that’s not necessarily a good thing. Like the tablet itself, the pen conveys an inferior and ultimately disposable feel,” Volpe reports. “Ding, ding, ding. That’s how many times the bell should ring to count out the Note 10.1′s 1,280 x 800 TFT LCD display. Samsung obviously made a compromise to keep costs down, but there’s really no reason for the company to have settled on such a middling display… “

Volpe reports, “What about the iPad? Indeed, Apple’s tidy iOS ecosystem is where most consumers will instinctively want to invest their dollars based on the tab’s nigh-ubiquitous market death grip. And we’d be hard pressed to direct their attention otherwise since Cupertino’s newest tablet iteration lays claim to the best panel available today — a 2,048 x 1,536 Retina display — and bears the same $499 pricing for a 16GB configuration. Laid out plainly as this, the Note 10.1′s case as a compelling tablet alternative is unavoidably weak… Ultimately, no matter how deftly executed and streamlined the S-Pen experience may be, this tab still feels like a niche device, especially since the suite of compatible applications is still pretty small.”

Read the whole story : Engadget

Massive HTC Android security flaw leaves security expert speechless

“I am quite speechless right now,” Artem Russakovskii reports for Android Police. “Justin Case and I have spent all day together with Trevor Eckhart (you may remember him as TrevE of DamageControl and Virus ROMs) looking into Trev’s findings deep inside HTC’s latest software installed on such phones as EVO 3D, EVO 4G, Thunderbolt, and others.”
“These results are not pretty. In fact, they expose such ridiculously frivolous doings, which HTC has no one else to blame but itself,” Russakovskii reports. “In recent updates to some of its devices, HTC introduces a suite of logging tools that collected information. Lots of information. LOTS. Whatever the reason was, whether for better understanding problems on users’ devices, easier remote analysis, corporate evilness – it doesn’t matter. If you, as a company, plant these information collectors on a device, you better be DAMN sure the information they collect is secured and only available to privileged services or the user, after opting in.”

“That is not the case,” Russakovskii reports.

What Trevor found is only the tip of the iceberg – we are all still digging deeper – but currently any app on affected devices that requests a single android.permission.INTERNET (which is normal for any app that connects to the web or shows ads) can get its hands on:

• the list of user accounts, including email addresses and sync status for each
• last known network and GPS locations and a limited previous history of locations
• phone numbers from the phone log
• SMS data, including phone numbers and encoded text (not sure yet if it’s possible to decode it, but very likely)
• system logs (both kernel/dmesg and app/logcat), which includes everything your running apps do and is likely to include email addresses, phone numbers, and other private info

Read more in the full article here.

Article from Android Police